Smoothie Recipes

I make smoothies a lot. I think it’s fun to use whatever ingredients you have on hand and experiment with different combinations. It’s easy to experiment when you’re making smoothies; you just toss in different stuff.

I usually text a good flavor combination to a friend who also has a Vitamix and also makes smoothies. This story about sharing recipes on Twitter {npr} gave me the idea to tweet my smoothie recipes.

But twitter can be clunky for that sort of thing so i made a site that automatically pulls in my latest smoothies. check it out here: smoothies.marchummel.com

Cheers.

Copyright, Art & Books

Read this article by Cory Doctorow on Salon for a fresh take on where today’s creators are and where they’re going in the new digital economy. I hadn’t heard of this:

Do you remember when the Authors Guild sued Google over Google Book Search, which is basically the right to make an index of stuff in books? They said to Google, “If you’re going to do this, you’re going to do it on our terms, and you’re going to have to give us a whole $70 million. And we want to establish that we’re not saying that it’s legal to do this for anybody. You have to come negotiate with us first, and next time the price might be higher!” Google said, “$70 million? Let’s shake the sofa and find some change for you.” Meanwhile, you are guaranteeing that nobody else in the future history of the world will be able to afford to index books, which is one of the ways people find and buy books. Now Google owns that forever, for a mere $70 million! Nice work, Authors Guild. You’ve just made us all sharecroppers in Google’s fields for the rest of eternity.

Ask a Robot to Tell You What to Cook

Watson—the supercomputer and Jeopardy star can now help you figure out what to make based on the ingredients you have on hand.

Well it can’t help you you, at least not yet. But the demo is pretty impressive:

If you give Watson a few ingredients and cuisine specifications, it can help you with recipe ideas. I had a few things in the kitchen, but I didn’t know what to make with them — ground turkey, frozen peas, dried mushrooms, canned tomatoes. I live in San Francisco, so it’s easy to get Asian and Mexican spices. [...]

“If you can understand what’s in an actual ingredient,” [IBM engineer Steven] Abrams says, “so what is in butter, what’s in strawberries, what’s in chocolate. What are the key flavor compounds that give them those pleasant sensations? Then, you can make predictions about what’s going to be pleasant, what’s going to be sweet and spicy and salty and savory.”

Read/listen to I’ve Got The Ingredients. What Should I Cook? Ask IBM’s Watson {npr}.

The End of an iEra

Love this piece by Mat Honan:

In all likelihood we’re not just seeing the death of the iPod Classic, but the death of the dedicated portable music player. Now it’s all phones and apps. Everything is a camera. The single-use device is gone—and with it, the very notion of cool that it once carried. The iPhone is about as subversive as a bag of potato chips, and music doesn’t define anyone anymore. Soon there will be no such thing as your music library. There will be no such thing as your music. We had it all wrong! Information doesn’t want to be free, it wants to be a commodity. It wants to be packaged into apps that differ only in terms of interface and pricing models. It wants to be rented. It wants to reveal nothing too personal, because we broadcast it to Facebook[...]

On Death and iPods {wired}