The history of the Mason jar

Mason Jar

Fascinating read:

This current incarnation of the Mason jar has a lot to do with the hunger for greater legitimacy: How can I be more real, and more unique in my realness? One of capitalism’s most enduring legacies has been persuading people that they can purchase a singular style. In some areas, like fashion, the effort to be unique has come full circle, so that the best way to be an individual is to dress with utter banality (hence the trend known as normcore). Mason jars—with their enticing aura of thrift, preservation, and personal labor—have become a potent signifier in this quest. Rather than ensuring against scarcity, however, Mason jars confirm the presence of abundance—and suggest that we’re rather fatigued by it.

Read The Mason Jar, Reborn {the atlantic}.

This app helps you avoid the crowd.

If you’re the type who tries to go where everyone isn’t, Avoid Humans may be the app for you.

It was designed as a way to “get away from it all” during this year’s SXSW, but it’s now available everywhere. It uses publicly available data from Foursquare and Instagram to try and predict which establishments have sparse human cover.

I launched it in my Philly apartment this evening and got the following results:

Avoid Humans app

I didn’t need an app to tell me I can go to a gas station to escape humanity for awhile. Also, pretty sure nobody uses Foursquare. Maybe they use Instagram though.

Via {Adweek}.

Nicholas Carr, observer of the tech absurd

Nicholas Carr, putting the “Internet of Things” into his razor-sharp perspective, as always.

Take the so-called Internet of Things. When we imbue an inanimate object, a thing, with smartness, we’re not conjuring up that smartness out of nothing. We’re simply transferring a bit of smartness that already exists, in our own minds, into the thing. IBM tells us that we’re building a Smarter Planet, but what IBM doesn’t say, at least not in its marketing materials, is that as the planet gets smarter its occupants get dumber.