Friday Link List: Design & Typography Edition

1. Jonathan Harris Interview {design matters}

Jonathan Harris is an artist and computer scientist whose work explores the relationship between humans and technology. His projects include We Feel Fine, a search engine for human emotions; I Want You To Want Me, an installation about online dating; Cowbird, a public library of human experience; 10 x 10, a system for encapsulating moments in time; The Whale Hunt, a series of photographs timed to match his heartbeat; and I Love Your Work, an interactive film about the daily lives of sex workers.

Jonathan has so many cool projects. Check out this manifesto about big data.

2. The Heartbleed Logo: How to Get People Talking About Internet Security {newsweek}

You’ve probably come across the bug’s logo: a crisp red heart that has five dripping bloody stalactites descending from it, suggesting that something important is bleeding out or crying. It’s on the Heartbleed Web site, put up by a security firm called Codenomicon, which co-discovered the bug. The logo is everywhere—and looks like a scary version of the American Heart Association’s Heart-Check symbol. It’s evocative and simple, and perhaps cheerful and sinister at the same time: Is this logo telling me my food is good for my heart, or is it telling me that my private data might have been made public?

3. Typekit Practice

Typekit Practice [is] a place where novices and experts alike can hone their typographic skills. We hope it will help students learn, help teachers teach, and help professionals stay sharp.

Via {daring fireball}

Friday Link List

1. The Inside Story of Aaron Schwartz and MIT {boston globe}

More than a year after Swartz killed himself rather than face prosecution, questions about MIT’s handling of the hacking case persist.

See also: this documentary.

 

2. Sad Youtube {tldr}

YouTube’s infamous for having one of the worst comment sections on the internet. There’s no reason to ever read them. Unless you’re writer & filmmaker Mark Slutsky. Mark spends hours scouring the comments section on YouTube, and occasionally, scattered in the dross, he finds small poignant stories for his site Sad Youtube.

 

3. Tetris Played on 29-Story Philly Skyscraper {daring fireball}

As part of Philly Tech Week, Dr. Frank Lee’s latest creation — a two-sided game of Tetris on the 29-story Cira Centre — illuminates the Philadelphia skyline.

Saw this in person—it was pretty cool.

 

4. If Daily Mail Articles Headlines Were Based on the Comments Section {tldr again}

Web designer Richard Westenra has created an ingenious browser plugin that swaps out the headlines from the British tabloid The Daily Mail with user comments about them.