Friday Link List

1. Meet the 83-Year-Old Taking On Gay Marriage at the Supreme Court {npr}.

If you’re like me, you’ve certainly heard that one of the articles in the Defense Of Marriage Act {wikipedia} is coming up in the Supreme Court, but didn’t know anything about how the case got here. From the story:

The tiny dynamo asking the U.S. Supreme Court to turn the world upside down looks nothing like a fearless pioneer. At age 83, Edith Windsor dresses in classic, tailored clothes, usually with a long string of pearls, and she sports a well-coiffed, shoulder-length flip. She looks, for all the world, like a proper New York City lady.

Proper she may be, and a lady, but Windsor, who likes to be called Edie, is making history, challenging the federal Defense of Marriage Act, known as DOMA. The law bans federal recognition and benefits for legally married same-sex couples.

 

2. The New Disruptors {podcast}.

Another great new podcast from Mule Radio Syndicate. I love these guys.

Anyway the podcast is hosted by Glenn Fleishman, and boasts a list of nerd-pleasing guests like Jason Fried of 37 Signals, Jim Coudal, John Gruber of Daring Fireball, and Andrea Seabrook.

Check it out. If you’re into that sort of thing.

 

3. The Transitory Web {daily dot; via andrew sullivan}.

Chris Albon laments the never-forgetingness of the internet:

The simple fact is that businesses are so motivated to capture all our data that increasingly anything we say or post online is recorded by default. And what’s worse, it’s not only the things we put online, but the things that other people put online about us. With Facebook’s photo tagging feature, a photo you never knew was taken—maybe at bar at 2am or on your couch after a long night of drinking—can become part of your digital reputation. The Web is quickly coming to the point that everything you say or do online can be used against you in the court of public opinion. Some say we could be looking at the end of forgetting, where the past can be accessed with the click of a mouse.