Dude watch this movie now.

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Super-interesting documentary that was released in 2010. It got a lot of attention over the past couple weeks thanks to some viral Facebook thing.

I know all this because I subscribe to the Sundance Now Doc Club email list.

Here’s how they described the film:

What is Marwencol? After a brutal beating stole his memory, artist Mark Hogencamp created a fictional town he named ‘Marwencol’ as a storytelling haven to help him recover from the traumatic attack. The doc follows Mark as his Marwencol photos gain national attention and bring his intensely personal, private work into the real world’s spotlight.

It’s a beautiful, poignant film, and one that serves as a powerful reminder of why we love documentaries in the first place – their ability to give us so intimate and honest a look at other people, other lives, and other perspectives we may never encounter otherwise.

And the trailer:

Doesn’t look like it’s on Netflix streaming (but yes DVD) and you can rent it on iTunes. (I borrowed a copy from my local library, thanks for asking.)

Give Me Your Best Lionel Richie Face

Photo of woman at Lionel Richie Show by Sandy Carson©sandy carson.

Austin-based photographer Sandy Carson has been capturing music fans in a professional capacity for eight years.

His series We Were There features pictures of iPhones, empathetic ladies, and young girls just about to go for that last Bud Light drop at a Lionel Richie show; bored/slightly angelic-looking people at a Fun concert; bulging eyeballs at an Odd Future show; white people watching Coldplay through their camera screens; a crowd-surfing wheelchair-bound gentleman in Chuck Taylors holding a cowboy hat at a Slayer show.

Found via {andrew sullivan}.

The Artifacts of the Insane

the artifacts of the insane

[Photographer Jon] Crispin’s latest fascination is with old suitcases — discovered by the New York State Museum in an attic of the Willard Psychiatric Center in Willard, N.Y. “The cases were put into storage when their owners were admitted to Willard sometime between 1910 and the 1960s,” Crispin explains on a Kickstarter page, where he is raising funds to continue photographing. “And since the facility was set up to help people with chronic mental illness, these folks never left.”

“Asylum Suitcases, Found And Photographed” {npr}.