On That Jony Ive Piece You’ve Already Read

This piece deserves all the attention it’s been getting this week. It’s full of amazing bits of prose like:

Ive’s career sometimes suggests the movements of a man who, engrossed in a furrowed, deferential conversation, somehow backs onto a throne.

and:

I asked Jeff Williams, the senior vice-president, if the Apple Watch seemed more purely Ive’s than previous company products. After a silence of twenty-five seconds, during which Apple made fifty thousand dollars in profit, he said, “Yes.”

And this part resonates with me a lot. We do need more people who care about what they do.

We were in the fast lane of I-280, in squinting low sunshine. When I asked for examples of design carelessness, Ive cranked the conversation back to Apple. He has the discipline to avoid most indiscretions, but not always the facility to disguise the effort. “At the risk of sounding terribly sentimental, I do think one of the things that just compel us is that we have this sense that, in some way, by caring, we’re actually serving humanity,” he said. “People might think it’s a stupid belief, but it’s a goal—it’s a contribution that we can hope we can make, in some small way, to culture.”

Read it here {new yorker}.

NPR One

New today from NPR: a great new way to experience public radio. It’s called NPR One. Upon opening the app for the first time, one confirms their local NPR affiliate and presses play. If you like what you hear, tap the “Interesting” button. If not, skip it. (You can also teach the app what you like by searching for topics and shows you enjoy.)

The more you use the app, the more it will learn about your interests. And the whole thing looks gorgeous and works great.

I’ve been using NPR One for about an hour so far, and it’s already provided me with an interesting mix of stories ranging from local news to a story from the NPR archives about why mammals need sleep.

It functions in a manner similar to Swell, the podcast app Apple has just reportedly purchased {tech crunch}.

It seems like a very forward-thinking move for NPR. It fulfills an emerging trend analogous to the gradual switch in listener habits moving from listening to music on iPods to streaming it on Spotify. Why bother managing episodes on a podcast app when you can use a service like NPR One instead?

It’s also a great way to get exposed to local news and break free from the filter bubble.

An Act of Privacy

I’ve been creeped out and generally dismayed about Google for quite awhile now. They shut down popular services. They limit your potential to see interesting things via filter bubbles.

They distract us from their real intent (and real profit engine) with self-driving cars and floating internet balloons {npr}.

It seems their desire to learn everything about us so they can sell that information back to advertisers is limitless.

Enter Google Mine {an unofficial google blog}, a new service that wants to know everything you own and want to own:

Google Mine lets you share your belongings with your friends and keep up to date with what your friends are sharing. It enables you to control which of your Google+ Circles you share an item with. It also lets you rate and review the items, upload photos of them and share updates on the Google+ Stream where your friends get to see and comment on them.

Via {daring fireball}.

Like I said, I’ve been skeptical about Google and their true intentions before. But the recent NSA leaks have accelerated my desire to limit my digital footprint, especially the one I leave behind with Google.

I’ve been using DuckDuckGo for search instead of Google for a few months now. It takes some getting used to, but I rarely switch over to Google to find what I’m looking for now. And apparently I’m not the only one: DuckDuckGo has been experiencing a surge in traffic {npr} since the controversial NSA program was revealed.

I moved all my mail from Gmail to my own server. I suppose the NSA can still track my emails, but it’ll be more difficult now. Besides, Gmail is free because Google benefits from the data it hosts. My data.

I don’t have much information on Facebook nor do I use the service very often, and I plan on keeping it that way.

Then there’s Apple. Yes, they were implicated in the recent NSA revelations. But check out their statement on the matter:

Apple has always placed a priority on protecting our customers’ personal data, and we don’t collect or maintain a mountain of personal details about our customers in the first place. There are certain categories of information which we do not provide to law enforcement or any other group because we choose not to retain it.

For example, conversations which take place over iMessage and FaceTime are protected by end-to-end encryption so no one but the sender and receiver can see or read them. Apple cannot decrypt that data. Similarly, we do not store data related to customers’ location, Map searches or Siri requests in any identifiable form.

Apple is a company that makes money from selling us cool new stuff. Google and Facebook make money from our information.

I’m much more comfortable with the former.

Friday Link List

1. How Many Gigatons of CO2? {information is beautiful}

We’ve condensed all the key numbers into a single diagram. It lays out the perils and potential effects of our global fossil fuel habit – and the urgency to balance our “carbon budget”.

2. Interview with Tim Cook {bloomberg}

Two things. One, I wouldn’t call it a process. Creativity is not a process, right? It’s people who care enough to keep thinking about something until they find the simplest way to do it. They keep thinking about something until they find the best way to do it. It’s caring enough to call the person who works over in this other area, because you think the two of you can do something fantastic that hasn’t been thought of before. It’s providing an environment where that feeds off each other and grows.

3. To Yelp or Not to Yelp? {npr}.

The next time you’re about to post a scathing review of a business on a site like Yelp or Angie’s List, you might want to think twice.

This week, a housing contractor named Christopher Dietz sued a former customer for $750,000 in defamation charges for what she wrote in a review on Yelp.